Eric and Irene: Have you left no sense of decency?

Great article from Paul Krugman on Eric  Cantor and his evil ways.

In case you missed it, Cantor now wants to require all disaster aid for Hurricane Irene be off set by budget cuts…

As Krugman says, he’s holding Irene’s victims hostage.  The good news is that George Allen, the probable GOP Senate nominee supports him and his position.  I hope they go down together.

I just can’t quite figure out how my birth state can justify electing people like this….

Back in the day, people who showed such callousness and disregard for people in trouble would have been shunned…

It’s no longer the gracious, genteel Virginia I once knew.

 

 

“Have you left no sense of decency?” That’s the question Joseph Welch famously asked Joseph McCarthy, as the red-baiting demagogue tried to ruin yet another innocent citizen. And these days, it’s the question I find myself wanting to ask Eric Cantor, the House majority leader, who has done more than anyone else to make policy blackmail — using innocent Americans as hostages — standard operating procedure for the G.O.P.

A few weeks ago, Mr. Cantor was the hard man in the confrontation over the debt ceiling; he was willing to endanger America’s financial credibility, putting our whole economy at risk, in order to extract budget concessions from President Obama. Now he’s doing it again, this time over disaster relief, making headlines by insisting that any federal aid to the victims of Hurricane Irene be offset by cuts in other spending. In effect, he is threatening to take Irene’s victims hostage.

Mr. Cantor’s critics have been quick to accuse him of hypocrisy, and with good reason. After all, he and his Republican colleagues showed no comparable interest in paying for the Bush administration’s huge unfunded initiatives. In particular, they did nothing to offset the cost of the Iraq war, which now stands at $800 billion and counting.

And it turns out that in 2004, when his home state of Virginia was struck by Tropical Storm Gaston, Mr. Cantor voted against a bill that would have required the same pay-as-you-go rule that he now advocates.

But, as I see it, hypocrisy is a secondary issue here. The primary issue should be the extraordinary nihilism now on display by Mr. Cantor and his colleagues — their willingness to flout all the usual conventions of fair play and, well, decency in order to get what they want.

via Eric and Irene – NYTimes.com.

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